While experts debate how quickly autonomous vehicles (AVs) will take over our roads, there is little doubt they will be a fixture in the next decade. Fully self-driving vehicles are predicted to substantially reduce the accident rate, given the dominant role of human error in most crashes today.

But there still will be accidents. And where there are accidents, there are plaintiffs’ lawyers. But who will these lawyers sue, and how will the defendants insure their liabilities?

We explore these questions in our article for WardsAuto. The full article is available, here.

Fewer and fewer companies in California have insurance coverage for “wage and hour” claims, i.e. claims for failure to pay overtime, failure to provide meal and rest periods, and failure to provide accurate itemized wage statements. Many times such coverage is prohibitively expensive or simply unavailable.  Accordingly, if a company in California has an Employment Practices Liability policy, it may have a very broad “wage and hour” exclusion.

Even if your policy has such an exclusion, there still may be hope. A recent unpublished decision by the Ninth Circuit in PHP Insurance Services, Inc. v. Greenwich Insurance Company, Case No. 16-15083, is a reminder that a mere allegation of a covered Employment Practices Wrongful Act may trigger a carrier’s duty to defend even if not asserted as a cause of action.  Continue Reading Ninth Circuit Affirms Carrier Had Duty to Defend Employment Class Action

I recently participated in a negotiation with an insurer who had denied coverage for an underlying errors and omissions claim in the mid-seven figures. The insurer’s counsel and I exchanged stern letters, each explaining why our respective client’s position was absolutely correct, and the other’s absolutely wrong. The client’s broker arranged a meeting with principals and counsel on both sides. At the meeting, the insurer’s counsel and I debated our respective positions once more. Neither of us conceded any possibility that the other could be right. After 25 minutes, my client put a stop to the debate competition and, aided by the broker, moved into negotiations with the insurer’s principal.

The opening offer and demand were miles apart. But within an hour, the case settled, to the clear satisfaction of both sides. With no mediator. No wrangling about which mediator to select. No waiting three months to get a date on the mediator’s calendar. No mediation briefs or reply briefs. No waste of non-refundable mediator’s fees. No shuttle diplomacy, bracketing or mediator’s proposals. No mediator reserving jurisdiction to hammer out disputed settlement terms. It felt almost too easy.

Are lawyers too dependent on mediators to settle their cases? Whether you answer that question yes or no, there are many situations where a neutral can resolve a case where party negotiations would fail. This is particularly true in a “three-way” mediation, where the defendant’s insurer is participating but is reserving rights, denying coverage, or rejecting defense counsel’s settlement recommendations. These mediations present unique challenges that require a skilled mediator and savvy defense and coverage counsel. Continue Reading A Policyholder Perspective on the Unique Challenges of a Three-Way Mediation

Michael KornFarella’s Insurance Recovery Group lawyers regularly collaborate with and learn from different players and functions within the insurance industry. To provide more value to our readers, we have reached out to a series of insurance brokers to create the Insurance Broker Series Q&A.

Our latest installment is with Michael Korn, Managing Principal, Property Practice Leader with Integro Insurance Brokers. Continue Reading Insurance Broker Series: Michael Korn, Integro Insurance Brokers

Larry RebackFarella’s Insurance Recovery Group lawyers regularly collaborate with and learn from different players and functions within the insurance industry. To provide more value to our readers, we have reached out to a series of insurance brokers to create the Insurance Broker Series Q&A.

Our latest installment is with Larry Reback, Managing Principal, Leader of Policy Response Unit with Integro Insurance Brokers. Continue Reading Insurance Broker Series: Larry Reback, Integro Insurance Brokers

John OrrFarella’s Insurance Recovery Group lawyers regularly collaborate with and learn from different players and functions within the insurance industry. To provide more value to our readers, we have reached out to a series of insurance brokers to create the Insurance Broker Series Q&A.

Our latest installment is with John M. Orr, Managing Principal – West Region Financial Lines Practice Leader with Integro Insurance Brokers. Continue Reading Insurance Broker Series: John Orr, Integro Insurance Brokers

Farella’s Insurance Recovery Group lawyers regularly collaborate with and learn from different players and functions within the insurance industry. To provide more value to our readers, we have reached out to a series of insurance brokers to create the Insurance Broker Series Q&A.

Our latest installment is with Daniel Law, Office President with The Liberty Company Insurance Brokers, Inc.   Continue Reading Insurance Broker Series: Daniel Law, The Liberty Company Insurance Brokers, Inc.

image: Are you Covered?Insurance recovery partner Tyler Gerking and I have co-authored an article examining two recent cases from separate California state courts that we feel correctly interpret the phrase “that particular part” as it applies to certain CGL policy exclusions, and apply it in its intended narrow sense. The rulings in Pulte Home Corp. v. American Safety Indemn. Co. and Global Modular, Inc. v. Kadena Pacific, Inc. are good news for contractors and are in contrast to some recent decisions by federal courts.

It is encouraging to see California appellate courts studying the meaning of the actual policy language, and not simply accepting insurers’ broad brush straw-man arguments about what CGL policies are, or are not, intended to cover. By comparing the actual language of exclusions against each other and comprehending what each one was intended to exclude, the Pulte Home and Global Modular courts realized that each exclusion had a specific intent, and the terms of one exclusion could not be imparted to another exclusion, nor could they all be “mushed together” to make one large, catch-all type exclusion.

Read the full article discussing the two cases.

Farella’s Insurance Recovery Group lawyers regularly collaborate with and learn from different players and functions within the insurance industry. To provide more value to our readers, we have reached out to a series of insurance brokers to create the Insurance Broker Series Q&A.

Our latest installment is with Michael Ferraro, Partner & Senior Vice President with Woodruff-Sawyer & Co.  Continue Reading Insurance Broker Series: Michael Ferraro, Woodruff-Sawyer & Co.

Farella’s Insurance Recovery Group lawyers regularly collaborate with and learn from different players and functions within the insurance industry. To provide more value to our readers, we have reached out to a series of insurance brokers to create the Insurance Broker Series Q&A.

Our latest installment is with Clark Morton, Partner & Senior Vice President with Woodruff-Sawyer & Co.  Continue Reading Insurance Broker Series: Clark Morton, Woodruff-Sawyer & Co.